Nazi prisoner doctors

Yodaiken, described how in September a 22 year old Jewish senior medical student, Adina Blady Szwajger, gave lethal doses of morphine to several elderly patients and about fifteen infants and children in order to spare them ignominious, certain death at the hands of the Nazis.

Nazi prisoner doctors

The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide by Robert Jay Lifton

Sigmund Rascher right on prisoners at the Dachau concentration camp in Rascher was a member of the Luftwaffe, the German air force, and a medical doctor, who was researching the effect of a plant extract on cancer.

He thought human subjects would be far better than rodents, and Himmler agreed, even though the two had met only a week prior. A study was begun at Dachau concentration camp. It was just one of many such studies, ostensibly meant to build on a growing medical Nazi prisoner doctors of human maladies.

Like most atrocities of the Holocaust, Nazi medical experiments stood at the perverse intersection of racism, industrialization, and science.

A couple years after the cancer study, when Rascher became interested in the effects of altitude, he claimed monkeys were not adequate test subjects and again requested that Dachau prisoners be made available. The experiments, conducted using an air force pressure chamber, were mostly fatal — prisoners were denied oxygen, as a pilot might be during freefall.

When Himmler suggested that any human who survived them be spared a death sentence and given life imprisonment instead, Rascher disagreed.

They were only Poles and Russians, he argued, there was no need to give them dispensation. Not all were killed; most of the experiments were meant to measure the rewarming process after hypothermia.

Although one victim later testified that some prisoners were thrown into boiling water. Fritz Friedrich Karl Rascher, described a visit to his nephew at Dachau concentration camp.

While Sigmund was away from his desk, Fritz read a report on a Polygal test the doctor had performed on prisoners. Four prisoners were executed and studied as they expired. The bullet emerged near the spleen.

It was described how the Russian twitched convulsively, then sat down on a chair and died after about twenty minutes. As Wolfgang Benz writes in Dachau Review: While pretending to be pregnant with her fourth child, Diehl was arrested for attempted kidnapping, and it was soon discovered that the other three children were also not biologically hers.

Rascher was also swiftly arrested as an accessory to all of the kidnappings, and for a series of other crimes, including the murder of his lab assistant. Himmler was angry and betrayed—particularly because the Raschers had so benefited from being in his good graces.

Unsatisfied by criminal charges, he condemned Rascher to the punishment he likely feared most: He was sent to Buchenwald in to languish as a common prisoner.

The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide by Robert Jay Lifton

InRascher was moved to Dachau and executed by firing squad mere days before the American liberation of the camp.The Nazi doctors who conducted medical experiments of the Holocaust violated the trust placed in them. The truth is the doctors escaped their crimes.

Nazi prisoner doctors

Humanities Unexplored history: Jewish prisoner-physicians in Nazi camps A doctoral student’s dissertation argues that hundreds of these doctors cannot be labeled as collaborators. Prisoner doctors In , prisoners who were interested in helping their sick fellow-prisoners began to play a leading role in both the medical “self-government” and among the staff on the wards.

The Nazi doctors who conducted medical experiments of the Holocaust violated the trust placed in them. The truth is the doctors escaped their crimes. Home; Photos and Art. Art. Prisoner doctors tell of the fate of two Hungarian twins who arrived atAuschwitz late in Dr.

Mengele was at the camp selection. In an attempt to find an antidote to phosgene, a toxic gas used as a weapon during World War I, Nazi doctors exposed 52 concentration-camp prisoners to the gas at Fort Ney near Strasbourg, France.

The Nazi doctors, medical experiments and Auschwitz Of the 15, seven were given the death penalty and eight imprisoned. Herta Oberheuser, the doctor who had rubbed crushed glass and sawdust into the wounds of her subjects, was the only female defendant in the medical trial.

Nazi prisoner doctors

prisoner and pathologist to Dr. Josef Mengele at .

The Nazi Doctors