The three arguments of pascals wager on the existence of god

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The three arguments of pascals wager on the existence of god

Pascal thought it was the strongest. Suppose someone terribly precious to you lay dying, and the doctor offered to try a new "miracle drug" that he could not guarantee but that seemed to have a chance of saving your beloved friend's life.

Would it be reasonable to try it, even if it cost a little money? Suppose you hear reports that your house is on fire and your children are inside.

Blaise Pascal - Wikipedia

You do not know whether the reports are true or false. Suppose a winning sweepstakes ticket is worth a million dollars, and there are only two tickets left. You know that one of them is the winning ticket, while the other is worth nothing, and you are allowed to buy only one of the two tickets, at random.

Most philosophers think Pascal's Wager is the weakest of all arguments for believing in the existence of God. Pascal thought it was the strongest. After finishing the argument in his Pensées, he wrote, "This is conclusive, and if men are capable of any truth, this is it." That is the only time. Before his death at the age of 76 on March 14, , Stephen Hawking was generally considered one of the smartest people on Earth. He was a world-famous theoretical physicist and cosmologist who received many honors for his work in the field of cosmology, quantum physics, black holes, and the nature of . Redated from March I was a Christian recently enough to remember what it felt like to really believe the Creator of the universe talked to me, to really believe I would go to heaven and unbelievers would go to hell, to really believe that prayer made a difference.. It sure felt like I really believed that stuff. And other Christians tell me they really believe that stuff, too.

Would it be a good investment to spend a dollar on the good chance of winning a million? No reasonable person can be or ever is in doubt in such cases. But deciding whether to believe in God is a case like these, argues Pascal. It is therefore the height of folly not to "bet" on God, even if you have no certainty, no proof, no guarantee that your bet will win.

Atheism is a terrible bet. It gives you no chance of winning the prize. To understand Pascal's Wager you have to understand the background of the argument. Pascal lived in a time of great scepticism. Medieval philosophy was dead, and medieval theology was being ignored or sneered at by the new intellectuals of the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century.

Montaigne, the great sceptical essayist, was the most popular writer of the day. The classic arguments for the existence of God were no longer popularly believed.

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What could the Christian apologist say to the sceptical mind of this age? Suppose such a typical mind lacked both the gift of faith and the confidence in reason to prove God's existence; could there be a third ladder out of the pit of unbelief into the light of belief?

The three arguments of pascals wager on the existence of god

Pascal's Wager claims to be that third ladder. Pascal well knew that it was a low ladder. If you believe in God only as a bet, that is certainly not a deep, mature, or adequate faith.

Stephen Hawking Says, “I’m an Atheist.”

But it is something, it is a start, it is enough to dam the tide of atheism. The Wager appeals not to a high ideal, like faith, hope, love, or proof, but to a low one: But on that low natural level, it has tremendous force.

Thus Pascal prefaces his argument with the words, "Let us now speak according to our natural lights. You wager blue chips to win blue prizes and red chips to win red prizes. The blue chips are your mind, your reason, and the blue prize is the truth about God's existence.

The red chips are your will, your desires, and the red prize is heavenly happiness. Everyone wants both prizes, truth and happiness. Now suppose there is no way of calculating how to play the blue chips.

Suppose your reason cannot win you the truth. In that case, you can still calculate how to play the red chips.Before his death at the age of 76 on March 14, , Stephen Hawking was generally considered one of the smartest people on Earth.

He was a world-famous theoretical physicist and cosmologist who received many honors for his work in the field of cosmology, quantum physics, black holes, and the nature of .

Blaise Pascal (/ p æ ˈ s k æ l, p ɑː ˈ s k ɑː l /; French: [blɛz paskal]; 19 June – 19 August ) was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic theologian. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in rutadeltambor.com's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of.

Update (Dec. 16): If you’re still following this, please check out an important comment by Alex Selby, the discoverer of Selby’s algorithm, which I discussed in the post.

Refutation of “Christ Revealed” docu-series Ep. 2 – The Godless Wolf

Selby queries a few points in the Google paper: among other things, he disagrees with their explanation of why his. Redated from March I was a Christian recently enough to remember what it felt like to really believe the Creator of the universe talked to me, to really believe I would go to heaven and unbelievers would go to hell, to really believe that prayer made a difference..

It sure felt like I really believed that stuff. And other Christians tell me they really believe that stuff, too. The best opinions, comments and analysis from The Telegraph.

Right, my point was that the advice should be not, “become hedge fund manager” or “become a doctor”, but rather, “become whatever it is that you have a good chance of being great at, then donate your money to whatever cause you want to support”.

Blaise Pascal - Wikipedia